American Quilt Study – part 2

Broderie-Perse was a hit in England before it came to America.  The ones we saw on this trip were all American made.

Part of the Townsend/Pope Legacy of Quilts

Part of the Townsend/Pope Legacy of Quilts

As the Tree of Life faded, broderie-perse blocks became the new thing.   Part of the Seminar is the reading of the papers.  Various women have chosen a subject and spent several years doing research on it.  Sharon Pinka  chose to study the quilts made by one low country family near Charleston.  She was able to discover and study eight quilts that have survived from a 100 year period.  1800 – 1900.  All of them were made with chintz fabric.  The two oldest ones (1820) are in the Smithsonian collection.   Another is in a museum in Vermont.  The above one was on display during the presentation as was the one below.

2nd of the family quilts on display

2nd of the family quilts on display

The two bed coverings above are spreads and not quits.  The one below was on display in the Charleston Museum.

3rd of the family quilts and dated 1840

3rd of the family quilts and dated 1840

The maker was so creative with her fabrics to turn them into a Urn and bouquet.  This was also not quilted.  We only saw a small section of this spread.

4th in the series and is quilted

4th in the series and is quilted

The above broderie-perse work was done in 1860.  A family member quilted the project in 1930.  We saw one more of the families quilts and it takes us the next step in quilt history: English Paper Piecing.

hexies

This is a quilt top and assumed to have been worked on at about 1840 by the same family.  It was never completed.  I love looking at the fussy cutting.  I cannot help but wonder if these treasures were well preserved because most of them were never finished and therefore never used or washed!

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The curator at the Charleston Museum is convinced that the southern women really enjoyed borderie-perse.  Not only do they have several tops and quilts,  they have numerous blocks in their collection.  The above picture is one of theirs.

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Hexagon paper pieced in the 1800s.

Hexagon paper pieced in the 1800s.

I am also showing a couple hexie quilts from the museum. The first one I am showing with the dark frames is dated 1860 and is made of silk.  I did not catch the date of the second one.  These are good examples of the fun prints and bright colors available in the 1800s.   The hexagons have periodic revivals.  They did in the 1930s and appear to have done so again now.

On part 3, I will share pictures of panels and share about a paper done on the subject.

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