American Quilt Study – part 5

Welcome to Charleston, SC

one of the doors to a porch

one of the doors to a porch

They sure know how to open the welcome door!  This one is one of many at a historic home my friend, VA, and I toured.  The entrance is actually a triple pane window.  The wood doors are the original doors.  A portico is on both floors of the home on one side and sometimes two sides.  They allowed for a lot of ventilation and enlarged the home for parties.  The members of the South Carolina quilt study group did an awesome job welcoming all of us.  Thank you.

STARS OF CHARLESTON-

Star of Bethlehem, Lone Star quilt

Star of Bethlehem, Lone Star quilt

We were able to see some beautiful workmanship on the star quilts.  The above one has been determined to have been made in the mid-1800s.  The floral designs are are done by broderie-perse.   The maker did not wear down and slap on a simple border!  She outdid herself with the diamonds!  The picture below might be a little more clear on the details.  This one comes from a Charleston family and was handed down from generation to generation.

another snap shot of the above quilt

another snap shot of the above quilt

We saw the below star in the storeroom.

2nd Star of Bethlehem quilt

2nd Star of Bethlehem quilt

It contains some great fabrics, in addition to the awesome workmanship.

blue border fabric

blue border fabric

I am adding a close up of the blue border fabric.  In addition you can see the quilting pattern.

3rd star quilts shown

3rd star quilts shown

The third star quilt is above.  The border has the Baptist fans and another pattern on the body of the quilt.

claimed to have been a quilt buried during the Civil War

claimed to have been a quilt buried during the Civil War

This fourth star quilt is different and fun to see.  The family that donated it to the museum shared how the family legend is that the quilt was buried with other treasures during the Civil War.   The curator shared how there is no way to prove it, but it is a fun story.   Can we wonder just what would be the condition of a quilt that had been buried?  Just what did the family choose to try to protect?

Home being preserved, but not restored

Home being preserved, but not restored

The front door of the home I started this blog with is  pictured above.  We visited one other home and it has been restored.  Isn’t it like antique quilts?   Some are preserved and some are restored.  Below is another picture of a home along the Battery.  It has another trait of Charleston homes:  beautiful gates.

Charleston home with beautiful gate and entrance

Charleston home with beautiful gate and entrance

A newer quilt was on display at the seminar.  The red work of the quilt is Charleston gates!

Charleston gates done in red work

Charleston gates done in red work

A hostess mentioned that the city had to pass a rule that the lovely gates cannot leave the city.  Apparently others wanted them at their homes elsewhere in the county.

Sights along the Battery

Sights along the Battery

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