Quilt classes at sea

When I travel a lot of stuff goes into my suitcases in zip-lock bags. They are light weight. My make-up bag is even a zip lock. I label them with sharpie markers like, Shower.

It was natural that all my fabrics also were in zip-locks and marked which class they were for. For a light weight tote to get them to class I used a simple fabric tote:

lite weight tote

lite weight tote

For me traveling is all about that 50# weight limit and how to get back home with added purchases.

I thought my bag looked nice and then I saw a gal with this bag:

img_4271

Now I get to my Di Ford class and all the gals have these neat small totes for their hand stitching supplies.:

 

img_4272

The gals gave me the source of the pattern and mentioned that they found the pattern a little tricky to figure out.  But it is worth it with all the different slots to sort the supplies.

organized storage

organized storage

Meanwhile all my plastic bags are sliding off the table onto the floor.

For a break we would slip into one of the other two classes to see what they were doing.  I showed you the carry-on suitcase of one of the gals in my last post. I missed getting a photo of her purse, but this is her sewing tool tote:

img_4269

img_4268-1

img_4267

Day 3 of classes I decided to have some fun and not have my plastic bags sliding all over the place:

img_4770

Yep, this wash tub was my tote of the day and I showed it off with pride! I also bragged of the price. $2.33

I also explained all the travel uses. The main one is doing hand laundry especially on a cruise ship with tiny sinks. What’s more, I leave it behind when packing for home along with grubby PJ’s and other throw away clothes.

If you are interested in making one of the totes, I did find the pattern after returning home.

img_4772

SewDemented@gmail.com

SewDemented.Wordpress.com

Happy organizing for your fall retreat!

Advertisements

BIG MISTAKE, BIG MISTAKE

Do you remember that line from the movie, Pretty Woman? The leading female actress was playing the part of a street walker and was hired by a very wealthy man. He gave her money to buy a cocktail dress. At the first shop it was suggested that she leave as they would have nothing for her.

The next day the man took her to another store and bought her a new wardrobe. On the way back to the hotel she stopped at the original store. That is were the fun line was stated, “Remember Me? Big mistake, Big mistake.”

First I need to share just how many quilters got off the ship on a free day in Crete.

fabric fanatics

fabric fanatics

Now you may view the fist shop sites as we got off the ship.

floral shop

floral shop

img_4423-1

The second photo was taken through the door of the closed shop. Big Mistake, Big Mistake.

We were all hungry for fabric! This was our last port!

Earlier on our trip, our guide to Florence took us to a beautiful fabric shop.

me touching fabric

me touching fabric

Yes, thats me touching very expensive fabric. Like 65-85 eros/meter. I am standing by the men’s shirting. There was also 100% ladies cotton very similar to Liberty of London fabric selling at 65 eros/meter.  We had all walked out of this shop empty handed. We concluded it was an Italian shop for custom tailoring.

On my last post I shared about one of the instructors, Di Ford. On the cruise I was introduced to two other instructors of the needle and my range of stitch thinking has been majorly widened. First I was introduced to Reiko Kato from Japan.

At St Paul, France

At St Paul, France

Reiko has been stitching since she was 4 years old.

Women were wise to take her classes. First because she is so inspiring. Second because she brought kits!  Unfortunately I did not get photos of her four different projects. The below picture is of one of the students progress.

parcial project

parcial project

Now for a photo of how she inspires her students from the past. This gal needs to learn English so that she can become an instructor. Her daughter was traveling with her to do the interpreting for her.

img_1367

Yes, you are looking at a carry-on sized suitcase. We all thought it needed a covering of some type just to preserve all the tiny details. This over-the-top stitcher had taken apart a suitcase and put it back together with this wool/cotton work on it.

As blogs are to encourage one another in our passions, I will share a photo of my carry-on.

Yup, that's duck tape holding it together!

Yup, that’s duck tape holding it together!

Traveling with Quilters

Wow, I have admired Di Ford’s quilts for a long time. Now I saw that she was to be one of the teachers on a cruise ship; a Mediterannian cruise at that. I have wanted to visit the countries in that region. I could take two items off the bucket list in one trip.

Di Ford with Me

Di Ford with Me

I found Di to be such a charming lady, in addition to a great quilt instructor.  She wanted each one of us to be successful.  I would get to be under her inspiration for the four days at sea.

Our first challenge was needle turn Brodery Perse. I have done it with a blanket stitch in the past. Now I learned how to make a beautiful urn with three different fabrics before I even started putting a flower arrangement together.

My Urn

My Urn

Di helped me see the potential of the fabrics I had brought along. I will say that bringing fabric was a challenge. I wanted appropriate clothes, sewing supplies, and empty space for shopping at seven ports! How much fabric could I pack? I settled for small pieces of many fabrics.

I should add that I was not even laying out the urn fabric in the direction that gave it the appearance of a curved shape. All the small tips became big learning opportunities.

In the above photo you get a glimpse of my stem fabric.  I learned that it did not have to be green.  What a profound bit of wisdom.  I have had the center floral arrangement on my design wall for over a year.  I did not proceed as there was something wrong with it.  Instantly I knew what it was; the green stems want to dominate the arrangement.

img_4559

I have appliquéd in the past, but it is not my favorite part of quilting.  However, once I was home I could not put it down until it was done.  Of course being travel weary is a good excuse to do some sitting.

Now about that shopping space I left in the suitcase:  Our first port was in France and we were bused to a linen/fabric store.  Deb Roberts is in the photo of the shop.  She is the travel planner for this trip.  I have been on two others of her trips.  She always find great places for us to see.

img_4175

The shop itself was mainly linens and they were lovely, but we were allowed into the back room!  But even better, we were taken to the warehouse.  And then the basement of the warehouse!

img_4176

The fabric sold for 9 eros/meter.  With a minimum cut of 3 meters.  Another gal and I split three different fabrics.  Back at the ship we cut them lengthwise to get the longest borders possible.

img_4177

Did I mention that I love border fabric?

Now the fabric I will be searching for has the appearance of rope.  That way I can continue with the medallion quilt.

img_4287

I have shopped locally for it already, so I will have to expand my search.  Of course what Di used is no longer on the market, so I will have to be satisfied with something else.

The above quilt is named “Jane’s Garden”  and the pattern will be in Di’s new book.  The quilt did not return to Australia with Di Ford.  Rather it went to France with Carol of Quilt Mania to be photographed for the book.

The AQS show comes to Des Moines, Iowa next month and it will provide me with a lot of shopping opportunities.

My second class will have to wait for my next posting.  marge